A Buck, a Bush and a Lily

Grey Rhebok (Pelea capreolus), 14 August 2020. Copyright 2020 Forgotten Fields. All rights reserved.

A Rhebok (Pelea capreolus), yesterday, in an ocean of wheat. It stood in the very field wherein I first saw one of its kind in 2017—who knows, it could be the same antelope! It stood stock-still as irreverently—at least, so it always feels in these moments—I photographed it. Not once did it stir; a most extraordinary thing for these famously shy creatures!

I also managed to photograph up close the flowers of the shrub I saw last week. I am convinced it is Eriocephalus africanus, the Cape Snow Bush1. The common name is fitting, the flowers do resemble snow from afar. My original guess that it was part of the Sutera family then was quite wrong; it is in fact a member of the Asteraceae (Daisy) family.

Cape Snow Bush (Eriocephalus africanus), 14 August 2020. Copyright 2020 Forgotten Fields. All rights reserved.

I did not mention this at the time, but last Friday, in a field that usually attracts no attention to itself, I glimpsed several lilies amongst the vegetation. Their shape and colour struck me, but the moment prevented me from taking a closer look2. Yesterday, I inspected them properly and beheld for the first time Gladiolus hirsutus, the Small Pink Afrikaner3.

Small Pink Afrikaner (Gladiolus hirsutus), 14 August 2020. Copyright 2020 Forgotten Fields. All rights reserved.

Another first sighting in the same field was of a white flower (below) that grew low upon the ground, that I am yet to identify4. There were some familiar faces too, however, most notably Lobelia tomentosa, its delicate violet flowers, no bigger than a fingertip, fluttering in the breeze. Look closely: a tiny, almost translucent spider is hiding behind its lower lip!

Unknown Flower, 14 August 2020. Copyright 2020 Forgotten Fields. All rights reserved.Lobelia tomentosa, 14 August 2020. Copyright 2020 Forgotten Fields. All rights reserved.

  1. “Cape” is taken from “The Cape”, the colloquial name for the Western Cape province of South Africa.
  2. I managed only to take the unfortunate photograph below from several metres away before hastily having to move on: Lilies in a Field, 07 August 2020. Copyright 2020 Forgotten Fields. All rights reserved.
  3. “Afrikaner” is Afrikaans for “of or from Africa” (pronounced [uffRikaahneR] with the [u] in “bluff”, a trilled [R] and the [i] in “in”), a word you would arrive at were you to add the “-er” in “southerner” to “(South) African”: “Africaner”.
  4. At first, I thought it was a relation of Hibiscus aethiopicus, which I encountered for the first time in 2018, but that species is alone in its genus. Scour as I might my reference book, I see nothing that resembles the flower.

2 thoughts on “A Buck, a Bush and a Lily

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s