Cape Skink, 30 April 2020. Copyright 2020 Forgotten Fields. All rights reserved.

© 2020 Forgotten Fields
The Cape Skink (Trachylepis capensis), a common lizard found in the Overberg region. Though wild, it takes much disturbance to drive it from the sun. I was all but upon this one before it hurried into its hole.
Mongoose, 30 April 2020. Copyright 2020 Forgotten Fields. All rights reserved.

© 2020 Forgotten Fields
Spot the mongoose. What I believe to be a Yellow Mongoose or Red Meerkat (Cynictis penicillata) standing in the stubble.
A Springbok, 17 April 2020. Copyright 2020 Forgotten Fields. All rights reserved.

© 2020 Forgotten Fields
I was surprised to spot a Springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis) yesterday, my first sighting of the antelope in the wild. (“Springbok” is Afrikaans for “jump-buck”, pronounced with a trilled “R”, “i” like the “a” in “about” and the “o” in “orange”.)
Bar-throated Apalis Male, 10 May 2017. Copyright 2017 Forgotten Fields. All rights reserved.

© 2017 Forgotten Fields
In 2017, as I began to take an interest in birdwatching, I photographed what at the time I believed to be a Cape Batis male for its black breast band. Today, I discovered by accident (whilst attempting to identify another bird) that it was, in fact, a Bar-throated Apalis (Apalis thoracica). I see now the magnitude of my error, but betwixt the African Stonechat (below, left1), the Cape Batis (below, right1) and the Bar-throated Apalis (below, centre), is it any wonder an amateur would be just a little confused!

African Stonechat, Bar-throated Apalis and Cape Batis, Copyright 1993, 1997, 2002, 2011, Variously Random House Struik (Pty) Ltd, Norman Arlott, F H Chamberlain Trading (Pty) Ltd

  1. Pairs: female left, male right.
Illustration: Sasol eBirds of Southern Africa Universal App., Copyright 1993, 1997, 2002, 2011: Variously Random House Struik (Pty) Ltd, Norman Arlott, F H Chamberlain Trading (Pty) Ltd
An African Stonechat, 05 October 2019. Copyright 2019 Forgotten Fields. All rights reserved.

© 2019 Forgotten Fields
Also taken Friday, an African Stonechat (Saxicola torquatus). This is the male of the species which I often mistake for the Cape Batis (Batis capensis) female, which it resembles at a glance. I made the error again on Friday, not recalling that I had photographed the bird in the field opposite earlier this year!
The First of the Swallows, 05 October 2019. Copyright 2019 Forgotten Fields. All rights reserved.

© 2019 Forgotten Fields
Taken Friday, a Greater Striped Swallow (Cecropis cucullata), usually the first of the swallow species to return to South Africa in spring (September to November). Extraordinarily fleet in the air, they are near impossible to photograph!